An Advent Meditation

Hello. Please listen to the songs via the links as you read and meditate on the poems and art I have chosen from among my favorites this advent season:

“After Annunciation” by Madeleine L’Engle

This is the irrational season
When love blooms bright and wild.
Had Mary been filled with reason
There’d have been no room for the child.

Fra Angelico’s “The Annunciation”

fra-angelico-the-annunciation1

“The Annunciatory Angel” by Luci Shaw

We can’t see
the heart hammering in the unearthly body,
but the announcement, the cracking open of a space
that encircled earth and heaven, must weigh
like a gold boulder in the belly.

How might it feel (if an archangel has feelings) to bear
this news? Perhaps as confounded as the girl, there
in the corner? We worry that she might faint.
Weep. Turn away, perplexed and fearful
about opening herself. Refuse to let the wind
fill her, to buffet its nine-month seed into her earth.
She is so small and intact. Turmoil will wrench her.

She might say no.

Guido Reni’s “St. Joseph”

st-joseph-1

Advent Hands by Catherine Adler

I see the hands of Joseph.
Back and forth along bare wood they move.
There is worry in those working hands,
sorting out confusing thoughts with every stroke.
“How can this be, my beautiful Mary now with child?”
Rough with deep splinters, these hands,
small, painful splinters like tiny crosses
embedded deeply in this choice to stay with her.
He could have closed his hands to her,
said, “No” and let her go to stoning.
But, dear Joseph opened both his heart and hands
to this mother and her child.
Preparing in these days before
with working hands
and wood pressed tight between them.
It is these rough hands that will open
and be the first to hold the Child.

The Nativity Story set in 2013:

Advent (On a Theme by Dietrich Bonhoeffer)
Pamela Cranston

Look how long
the weary world waited,
locked in its lonely cell,
guilty as a prisoner.

As you can imagine,
it sang and whistled in the dark.
It hoped. It paced and puttered about,
tidying its little piles of inconsequence.

It wept from the weight of ennui,
draped like shackles on its wrists.
It raged and wailed against the walls
of its own plight.

But there was nothing
the world could do
to find its own freedom.
The door was shut tight.

It could only be opened
from the outside.

Who could believe the latch
would be turned by a pink flower —
the tiny hand
of a newborn baby?

Peter Brandl’s “Simeon with Infant Jesus”

jwn-19909-simeo

The Coming by R.S. Thomas

And God held in his hand
A small globe. Look, he said.
The son looked. Far off,
As through water, he saw
A scorched land of fierce
Colour. The light burned
There; crusted buildings
Cast their shadows: a bright
Serpent, a river
Uncoiled itself, radiant
With slime.
On a bare
Hill a bare tree saddened
The sky. Many people
Held out their thin arms
To it, as though waiting
For a vanished April
To return to its crossed
Boughs. The son watched

Them. Let me go there, he said

“To rescue the biologically living, yet spiritually dead, the Spiritual life of God became biological and died.”

Hannah Varamini and Behzad Varamini, Professors of Biological Science

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One thought on “An Advent Meditation

  1. Pingback: Advent: My Own and the Church’s | Make It Quirk

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